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All aerial pics are Photos by Kat
Photo: E. Cleven
Photo: Mike Cleven
Aerial View of Marble Canyon and Pavilion Lake  Photo by Kat
Aerial pic from Photos by Kat

Marble Canyon

Main wall of Marble Canyon, Pavilion Lake BC
Photo: Mike Cleven
Although most of the pictures here are black-and-white, either from my own work of borrowed from the BC Provincial Archives or other sources.  I am hoping to find - or take myself - enough colour material to give an idea of the range and subtlety of the canyon's limestone walls and hidden gorges.  Most of the rock is white-to-orange, with the three lakes in the valley possessing their own particular shades of deep blue.  The rock wall on the canyon's north side is higher, at up to 3000' above the lakes, while the south wall is around 1000'; the valley floor's elevation is around 3500'.  The landscape in the area is a limestone karst, from which it may be inferred (perhaps in error) that at one time the canyon was a huge cavern or chain of caverns that eventually collapsed and became further eroded; even today, Pavilion Creek disappears underground shortly after leaving Pavilion Lake, re-emerging a few miles down-valley.  Some of the side canyons on the north wall are very deep and are largely unclimbed and unexplored.  Towards the top of the main face (at the centre-right of the first picture below) there is a hole-in-the-wall formation piercing the curtain-wall of the largest of these gorges.  The hole-in-the-wall is so high up that it appears only as a pinprick from the roadside far below, and is only visible when an overcast sky reveals its presence as a white dot in a crack in the cliff-face; yet it's supposed to be 20 yards wide or so I was told by someone who'd been up there.  The top of the main cliffs is one of the north shoulders of Pavilion Mountain, as is the ridge on which stands Chimney Rock (the last picture on this page); conceivably the north precipice of the canyon could be approached from the Pavilion Mtn fire-lookout road from the Diamond S, or (so I was told) from the Two Springs Road a few miles east of the Hat Creek Jnctn at the eastern end of the canyon.


BCArchives # H-02933
BC Archives # NA-11619, Mountain/canyon wall NE of Pavilion Lake (Marble Canyon)


BC Archives # NA-11619

BC Archives # C-09841, road through Marble Canyon
BC Archives # C-09841
BC Archives # C-01333, entrance to Marble Canyon from Hat Creek
BC Archives # C-01333

BC Archives # H-01003, Marble Canyon Road, Pavilion
BC Archives # C-01279
BC ARchives # NA-12025, road near Pavilion Lake
BC Archives # NA-12025

BC Archives # H-00994, Model T in Marble Canyon
BC Archives # H-00994
BC Archives # NA-12020 View of Crown Lake, Marble Canyon BC Archives # NA-12020

bc BC Archives # NA-12021
BC Archives # C-0279, Little Summit Lake at Marble Canyon, Pavilion, 1946
BC Archives # C-01279

BC Archives # NA-12029, Views Around Pavilion, Pictograph Rock in Marble Canyon, 1948, BC Forest Service Photo
BC Archives # NA-12029

BC Archives # H-01004, road through Marble Canyon, Pavilion BC
BC Archives # H-01004




BC Archives # NA-12022, falls at Crown Lake, Marble Canyon
BC Archives # NA-12022
BC Archives # NA-12023, Falls at Crown Lake, Marble Canyon
BC Archives # NA-12023




BC Archives # NA-12027, cabins & dock at Pavilion Lake
BC Archives # NA-12027
BC Archives # NA-12024, picnic site at Pavilion Lake
BC Archives # NA-12024



BC Archives # NA-12019, Views around Pavilion Lake (main wall of Marble Canyon)
BC Archives # NA-12019

BC Archives # NA-12028, rental boats at Pavilion Lake
BC Archives # NA-12028
BC Archives I-22332, Main Wall of Marble Canyon, Pavilion Lake BC
BC Archives # I-22332


.

I have strong memories of Marble Canyon and Pavilion Lake from an overnight camp we made there one spring equinox in the early '80s.  We slept in the back of a '64 Impala station wagon, and woke up hearing the most remarkable noise - as if bells were ringing in the canyon, mixed with roaring and howling as if every beast in the valley were enraged or terrified; no doubt some of them were.  Some of them perhaps were - but the main part of the noise, as it turned out, was caused by the grinding against the shore of the icesheet on Pavilion Lake.  We sat and listened for at least two hours, completely in awe - it was as loud as it was strange - until we grew cold and decided we needed to find somewhere for coffee (which was at least 30 miles away).  One story I've heard is that the valley was taboo in some way for natives, as at one time there had been a great battle fought there where many warriors died who haunt the place; remembering the sound that lake made, I can see where some of that belief came from.

A community of the Bonaparte Band of the Secwepemc (Shuwsap) nation is situated within the valley's eastern end, and the village of the Pavilion Band (Tskwaylaxw Nation) at the western outlet, where the Pavilion valley opens onto the Fraser Canyon.  There are many abandoned quiggly hole (pit-house) towns in the valley.  One of the largest of them is at the foot of the canyon wall at the back of the fifth picture below, which is taken from the canyon's south wall above the western end of Pavilion Lake.
Aerial View of Marble Canyon and Pavilion Lake  Photo by Kat
Aerial pic from Photos by Kat
Aerial View of Marble Canyon and Pavilion Lake  Photo by Kat
Aerial pic from Photos by Kat
Aerial View of Marble Canyon and Pavilion Lake  Photo by Kat
Aerial pic from Photos by Kat
Aerial View of Marble Canyon and Pavilion Lake  Photo by Kat
Aerial pic from Photos by Kat


Aerial View of Marble Canyon and Pavilion Lake  Photo by Kat
Aerial pic from Photos by Kat
Aerial View of Marble Canyon and Pavilion Lake  Photo by Kat
Aerial pic from Photos by Kat


View of Hat Creek Country from south wall of Marble Canyon
view of Pavilion Lake, '50s, Photo E Cleven
view of Pavilion Lake, '50s, Photo E Cleven
view of Pavilion Lake, '50s, Photo E Cleven


Hat Creek Ranch


BC Archives # A-03503, Hat Creek Roadhouse at Carquile
BC Archives # A-03503
BC Archives # E-03334, Lower Hat Creek Ranch
BC Archives # E-03334
Aerial View of Carquile (Lower Hat Creek), Bonaparte River Valley along Hwy 97 N. of Cache Creek. Photo by Kat
Aerial pic from Photos by Kat
Aerial View of Carquile (Lower Hat Creek), Bonaparte River Valley along Hwy 97 N. of Cache Creek. Photo by Kat
Aerial pic from Photos by Kat
BC Archives # G-08760, coal on banks and bed of stream in Hat Creek area
BC Archives # G-08760
BC Archives # G-08761, 50' coal outcrop at Hat Creek, 1910
BC Archives # G-08761
BC Archives # F-02699, 40' Prospect shaft at Hat Creek coal deposits, 1910
BC Archives # F-02699
BC Archives # H-05408, Award-winning horse at Hat Creek Ranch, 1910s
BC Archives # H-05408
BC Archives # G-08762, 40' seam at Hat Creek coal outcrop, 1910
BC Archives # G-08762




 
 

Chimney Rock


Chimney Rock, Pavilion Lake, Marble Canyon BC
Photo: Mike Cleven
BC Archives # C-09846, Chimney Rock at Pavilion Lake (Marble Canyon)
BC Archives # C-09846
BC Archives # NA-12026, Chimney Rock near Pavilion Lake
BC Archives # NA-12026
Chimney Rock at Pavilion Lake-Marble Canyon, M. Cleven Photo
Photo: Mike Cleven


 





















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Nestled in a canyon between Lillooet and Cache Creek is Pavillion Lake, which contains mysterious underwater formations of coral-like structures, some of which are up to four metres high, up to 11,000 years old, and covered in mats of microscopic, sunlight-loving microbes. Teams of scientists from NASA, Simon Fraser University and Portland State University believe that the massive structures have been created by microbes and are not found anywhere else in the world. The Underwater Council of BC has applied to the province for their protection.
-quote from http://www.britishcolumbia.com/regions/towns/?townID=3390&webregionid=2